Boxwood Garden in Pastel

I’m very pleased with how this pastel painting turned out.  It is of the boxwood garden at the Missouri Botanical Garden.  I really like the contrast of the vertical brickwork in the foreground left and the fountains on the lower right, with the horizontals of the garden behind it. It is very colorful.  There is a warm, sunny feel to this piece.  You can see the gazebo through the round opening in the brick wall.  I really enjoyed creating this painting.

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“Boxwood Garden”, pastel on pastel board, 24″ x 18″
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Riot of Spring Blooms

I will never, ever get tired of spring flowers.  I also love architecture.  I love the way the architecture combines with growing things.  The flowing, soft lines of nature contrast well with the hard, straight, geometric lines of things built by humans.

One day last spring, my husband and I were driving around in his truck looking for something to paint.  We were driving around the Tower Grove south neighborhood of St. Louis.  As we drove down a side street, I was drawn to this whimsical, charming and delightful home filled with all kinds of flowers and neat things.  I introduced myself to the owner of the home, and she was just as delightful.  I started this painting in the bed of my husband’s truck.  It was so windy, he ended up holding on to the easel as I started the painting.  After about an hour of this we both became quite uncomfortable (it was cold, too).  So I took a photo, and finished the piece in my studio.

Here is the listing in my etsy store.

Riot of Spring Blooms
Riot of Spring Blooms, oil on canvas panel, 16″ x 20″

Closeup of Pink Tulip

I think flowers are my favorite part of nature.  In spring, I can’t help but be so enchanted by their color, their beauty, their sweetness, their fragrance.  Here is a closeup of a tulip done in oil.  I used Permalba white, naples yellow, permanent rose, sap green, indigo blue, and burnt umber.

I love to paint the subtle changes in value in the petals, and also the internal structures of the flower.

For some reason this tulip reminded me of my mother.  This painting has a soft quality to it, and is painted mainly in cool tones.

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Softness of Spring, oil on panel, 16″ x 20″

 

Color Effects in Art

Hey guys.  The wind chill was minus 10 Farenheit when I awoke this morning.  I am enjoying my day of staying at home and cooking and doing art.  This morning I baked banana bread and started beef goulash in the slow cooker.  Now, I just got done working on a pastel painting.  I’m using a rough, toothy pastel board of about 20 inches by 16 inches.  It is brick red on the front.  This will help create unity in the painting, as little splotches of this will show up throughout.

I use mostly Nupastels and Unison pastels.  I also use other brands, such as Schmincke, Sennelier, and others.

I started this several weeks ago.  I’m using a photo as a reference point for it.  I took the photo at the Missouri Botanical Garden several years ago.  It was a potted plant – some type of daisy.  Color is my favorite aspect of art. I’ve been told I have a strong sense of light in my paintings.  I’m very glad, because this is what I aim for – color and light.  Since I’m on the autistic spectrum, I also can’t help but be detailed.  That is how my mind works.

As you can see, I’ve painted in the background around the flowers.  I think the flowers will be easy.  I’m doing a secondary color triad (green, violet, orange).  I realized that there is quite a lot of gold and orange in the greens, and an orange influence in the flowers, too.  I really love the lighting effects on the leaves, and on the sphagnum moss. The trick to achieving an effect of strong lighting is to contrast light with dark mainly, and secondarily to contrast color temperatures between light and shadow areas.

I’m seeing that the background is quite busy.  I will just go ahead and do the daisies, then see if and how much I need to soften and simplify the background.

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